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Now I See

How Not to Die

This amazing piece from Crunk Feminist Collective speaks to the effect that relentless stress and "doing too much" takes on us—physically and emotionally.
 
While the focus here is on the impact  of stress on our bodies, it acknowledges that it also brings us down emotionally. That's just as bad...and the two work together for our detriment. 

Here's a quote: 

"It is a problem when caretaking (taking care) becomes something we do for other people and not ourselves.  It is up to us to survive and not just survive but thrive in our lives.  To not put work above living.  To not make ourselves our last resort.  To not wait until we are tired to rest.  To not wait until we are sick to make healthy choices.  To not wait until we have pleased everyone else to think about our own needs.  To not postpone our own happy.  To not just tolerate foolishness."

To that end, the piece offers 13 survival strategies, including: 
#2.  Say No.
#6.  Purge anything toxic in your life.
#13.  Let people do things for you.  (And I would add to that: ASK people to do things for you!

Take care of yourself—by any means necessary. 

1 Comment to How Not to Die:

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Lori on Saturday, September 20, 2014 7:44 AM
Between the emotional roller coasters of taking care of a parent with early on set of Alzheimer's, beginning at the age of 22 (right after college) to marrying and having children while experiencing the mental decline of that parent during their "long walk home" (18 years from diagnosis to death), working too hard for 30 years (with little work-life balance/health), to now again caring for another but younger life of 19years (a younger half sibling who has been with me since March of 2014)...I realized that I am strong but I am broken. Thank you for being some of my much needed inspiration to healing myself. I'm working on building my tool kit to rebuild myself. It's long over due for s-o many reasons! --- Your Hampton Sister
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